4K Video Resolution

What is 4K Video Resolution

4K is a new resolution standard designed to digital cinema and computer graphics. It’s advantage in the fact that it provides for a higher image definition quality, more detailed picture and offer better fast-action and larger projection surface visibility. 4k is called so due to its approximately 4,000 pixel horizontal resolution as opposed to standard 1080p and 720p resolutions that are called so due to their vertical resolution. The new standard renders more than four times higher image definition than that of 1080p.

Now that Intel Ivy Bridge processor support 4K resolution, desktop and laptop monitors can have such high resolution which is 4 times that of Full HD 1080p. Intel is key because for graphics most of the computers are depended of intel graphics

This format provides for no change in horizontal resolution, and change in aspect is made through the vertical resolution. For example 4096×2304 is a frame size with aspect 16:9 and 4096×3072 — 4:3.

The digital video resolutions examples:

Full Aperture 4k 4096 x 3112 12,746,752 pixels
Academy 4k 3656 x 2664 9,739,584 pixels
Digital Cinema 4k 4096 x 1714 7,020,544 pixels
Digital Cinema Aperture 4k 3996 x 2160 8,631,360 pixels

QFHD (3840×2160)

Quad Full High Definition (QFHD), at 3840 x 2160 (8,294,400 pixels), doubles the 1080p high-definition television standard in both the vertical and horizontal dimensions.

QFHD (3840×2160)

1080p
(1920×1080)

1080p
(1920×1080)

1080p
(1920×1080)

1080p
(1920×1080)

Digital cinematography is the process of capturing motion pictures as digital images, rather than on film. Digital capture may occur on video tape, hard disks, flash memory, or other media which can record digital data. As digital technology has improved, this practice has become increasingly common. Many mainstream Hollywood movies now are shot partly or fully digitally.

Digital cinematography’s acceptance was cemented in 2009 when Slumdog Millionaire became the first movie shot mainly in digital to be awarded the Academy Award for Best Cinematography[1] and the highest grossing movie in the history of cinema, Avatar, not only was shot on digital cameras as well, but also made the main revenues at the box office no longer by film, but digital projection.

All formats designed for digital cinematography are progressive scan, and capture usually occurs at the same 24 frame per second rate established as the standard for 35mm film.

The DCI standard for cinema usually relies on a 1.89:1 aspect ratio, thus defining the maximum container size for 4K as 4096×2160 pixels and for 2K as 2048×1080 pixels[2] (either 24fps or 48fps). When distributed in the form of a Digital Cinema Package (DCP), content is letterboxed or pillarboxed as appropriate to fit within one of these container formats.

Digital cinema formats.svg

In the last few years, 2K has been the most common format for digitally acquired major motion pictures however, as new camera systems gain acceptance, 4K is becoming more prominent (as the 1080p format has been before). During 2009 at least two major Hollywood films, Knowing and District 9, were shot in 4K on the RED ONE camera, followed by The Social Network in 2010.

Intel: Higher Resolution Displays Coming 2013

Intel foresees ultra-dense resolutions coming to a wide-range of mainstream displays by the year 2013.

According to a presentation caught by Liliputing, Intel has made it abundantly clear that current resolutions lack the necessary pixels-per-inch (PPI) to efficiently complete everyday media tasks. To solve this problem, Intel is supporting plans for “Retina”-like displays in the near future. The company specifically expects 5-inch Smartphones at a resolution of 1280×800, 10-inch Tablet devices at a resolution of 2560×1440, 11-inch and 13-inch Ultrabooks at 2560×1440 and 2800×1800 respectively, and 15-inch Notebooks and 21-inch All-in-one desktops at a resolution of 3840×2160.

During the Intel Developer Forum presentation, Kirk Skaugen, Vice President and General Manager of PC Client Group stated that Ivy Bridge is “Retina display capable”. A “Retina” display is a screen with such densely populated pixels that the human retina cannot discern one pixel from another at a typical viewing distance. One major obstacle when it comes to mainstreaming Retina technology is the need for adequate processing power. Intel overcame this obstacle with its upcoming Ivy Bridge processor line, bringing integrated graphics capable of powering 2560×1600 resolution displays.

It’s nice to see Intel making a push in the advancement of screen technology, but it will need consumers to make the final push in the desire to purchase displays with such high resolutions, which will likely cost a pretty penny.

For a more detailed look of the future Intel predicts, check out this road map: